Dr Big

Full Version: Chain issue
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That Beer looks very inviting Colum.

Funny how you had issues with that Tourance bead. I just sorted a cush drive wheel for the CCM. It came with a Tourance on it. Had to take it to work to break the bead with the tyre machine. Got home to lever the bugger off........what a barsteward it was!. Mounted new Mitas E09 Dakar with ultra heavy duty tube..... was pretty easy for a Mitas Smile Then I couldn't the get the bugger to seat. Numerous inflates/deflates and soapy water.....then pop! No, not the bead, Edward the Compressor decided to crap itself Sad So, back to work armed with soapy water and levers etc. Got it seated ok in the end. I hate doing tyres.
(24-08-2020, 05:04 PM)ladder106 Wrote: [ -> ]Hard to tell which part of the tube was punctured but that looks a lot like a spoke nipple hole.

I’ve gone to high temp duct tape (yes there is such a thing) and binned my rubber rim strips. Seems to work well.

Interestingly, when I mount a tire using this I never see soapy bubbles bleeding out through the spoke holes any more so the tape does have some sealing property. I’m thinking that this might slow down air escape in the moments just after a puncture (at least until the bead comes away) and may give me a bit more time to notice and react. Whistling in the dark?
I'll be doing that the next time the tyres are off, good idea. A front deflation would be nasty so any delay is welcome. 
I think the puncture was a pinch. Using the new wheel mate and I guess theres a learning curve. 
(24-08-2020, 05:29 PM)nug Wrote: [ -> ]That Beer looks very inviting Colum.

Funny how you had issues with that Tourance bead. I just sorted a cush drive wheel for the CCM. It came with a Tourance on it. Had to take it to work to break the bead with the tyre machine. Got home to lever the bugger off........what a barsteward it was!. Mounted new Mitas E09 Dakar with ultra heavy duty tube..... was pretty easy for a Mitas Smile Then I couldn't the get the bugger to seat. Numerous inflates/deflates and soapy water.....then pop! No, not the bead, Edward the Compressor decided to crap itself Sad So, back to work armed with soapy water and levers etc. Got it seated ok in the end. I hate doing tyres.
Yeah Ive had difficulty with getting the usual pops from a front tourance as they seat. They appear seated with the bead line concentric but I did notice when the tyre was flat the next morn after the puncture the tyres bead had moved into the well.
This is majorly worry some as if I get a puncture I'll be skating on rim. My compressor won't go much past 100psi abd having maxed it and bounced the rim hard I still get no pops. 
I installed an uhd Mitas tube and will take the bike to a mates more powerful compressor and maybe try 120 psi but as Ladder has mentioned before there's a lot of potential energy kicking about so will be round a corner doing it. Any thoughts yourselves lads? Must you hear a pop to know its seated and when deflated why is it in the well?
Hearing a distinct “POP” only happens to me about 2 out of 10 times. I just watch the “low” spot and wait for it to come up and show me the tire is concentric all ‘round and rim. I stop inflating there. I think the sound is only going to happen if a large section of bead has not seated and then it all comes up against the rim at once.....POP. Jamming more air into the tire that’s already concentric on the rim is asking for trouble. (Envisioning a joking friend standing behind you with a fire cracker)

I think the sound really only happens when your not using enough lubricant.

But I inflate with a high quality bicycle pump. So maybe the “pop” happens with a large capacity compressor that can jam in 40 to 60 psi in seconds.

I think it’s in the well when it defeated because your tire was new and not stuck to the rim since the soapy water was probably still fresh. Note the difference between beads in a new tire and one that’s been on the bike for a year or so.

The above is all conjecture so I stand to be corrected by anyone who has facts.

Mounting your own tires builds character, Nug
Character building indeed Ladder.
I have had the pleasure of mounting many a tyre over the years, bikes, cars, trucks etc. mostly by hand with the usual levers, sweat, and swearing. I think motorcycle tyres have probably given me the most grief out of all of them. There are so many variables depending on rim style, safety bead, tyre bead etc. You don't always get a "pop" as you say. It is usually when you have a defined safety bead on the rim and accentuated by a fresh tyre that is tighter than jocks wallet.

I am far more patient with a difficult tyre nowadays. Luckily I now have the use of a tyre machine for cars tyres. Shame it won't do bikes tyres though.
I worked in a truck repair and fueling depot as a teenager. The old guy there specialized in replacing truck tires and repairing tubes.

Dunno if the UK ever used “split-rim” wheels on trucks but there were used in the 60s and 70s in the USA. The wheel comes apart in 2 halves (left and right) and is hell together by a large locking ring that goes the circumference of the wheel. When the new tire/tube is installed and the lock ring set (you hope) the whole thing goes into a large metal cage with 1 in diameter bars to be inflated and everyone retires a safe distance

Every once in a while the ring would not seat properly and the whole thing would let go with an ear-crushing boom. Scared me out of a years growth first time I heard that.

That’s one reason I respect the energy all that air has under pressure.
Yes ladder we have had the the spit rims you describe. Some of the military and fire trucks I used to build had 24r21 tyres which where always scary to inflate as we didn't have the required safety cage in our workshop. We would usually use a contractor to mount tyres, but if we were in a rush we would do it. I have my old 1974 Jeep J20 sitting in the garage which has firestone split rims. Unfortunately one of the rings is stretched thanks to an unskilled tyre fitter screwing it up. Do you think I can find another in the UK? No chance. Will end up swapping to conventional tubeless rims.
(27-08-2020, 11:51 PM)nug Wrote: [ -> ]Yes ladder we have had the the spit rims you describe. Some of the military and fire trucks I used to build had 24r21 tyres which where always scary to inflate as we didn't have the required safety cage in our workshop. We would usually use a contractor to mount tyres, but if we were in a rush we would do it. I have my old 1974 Jeep J20 sitting in the garage which has firestone split rims. Unfortunately one of the rings is stretched thanks to an unskilled tyre fitter screwing it up. Do you think I can find another in the UK? No chance. Will end up swapping to conventional tubeless rims.
[Image: ebay149365668163112.jpg]
What a cool looking jeep they are! We need pics Nug.
Great looking Jeep. Left hand drive?

Must look like a giant going down some of your narrow lanes.
Yep its a left hooker Ladder. Not got any pics to hand at the moment. The old girl is covered up and blocked in pending my getting of my arse to get some work done on it. Its ex USAF and low mileage. Its need restoration now though. Had it since the mid 90's and is probably the 4th one I have had over the years. Also had Cherokees, and a Wagoneer (which I still have), plus the oddball CJ10A which I built from a flightline tow tractor into Military style pickup. I sold that to a collector in Italy some years back. Link to a page he did on it http://www.bondesan.net/oldnews/cj10a/news.htm Always been a massive fan of the Full size Jeeps. I managed to buy a 1978 Cherokee Chief as my first car when I was 17. Would never be able to insure one at that age now!
Back to chain issues.....

Last weekend before taking the DR out for a run into Wales, I noticed that the split link looked a little tight, so forced some oil past the X ring with the help of a fine screwdriver and thought....I'll do that next week, anyway no issues on the 240mile ride.
Last week I extracted the split link and it fell out on the floor, one pin had completely fractured....there was no grease left on the pin and it had corroded....it was an AFAM 525 high quality X ring chain, so I replaced it with the same.
it's been on a few years and done about 30,000km's, with 3 front sprockets, 2 rear,  so I suppose I can't complain.
Dave.
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